Tag Archives: trauma

Emotional Impact of the Separation of Children and Parents at the US Border

On June 20, 2018, the American Psychiatric Association (of which I am an Assembly Member) and 17 other mental health organizations joined forces in a letter to the Departments of Justice, of Homeland Security and of Health and Human Services, urging the administration of President Donald Trump to end its policy of separation of children from their parents at the United States border.

The letter states that “children are dependent on their parents for safety and support. Any forced separation is highly stressful for children and can cause lifelong trauma, as well as an increased risk of other mental illnesses, such as depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In addition, the longer that children and parents are separated, the greater the reported symptoms of anxiety and depression for the children.”1

The separation and detention of minors is a human rights crisis

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child emphasizes the importance of considering “the best interests of the child.”2 These interests include:

  • Protection against discrimination
  • Safety
  • Wellbeing
  • Health
  • Ensuring to the maximum extent possible the child’s survival and development
  • Preservation of the child’s identity
  • Family integrity
  • Protection against the separation from parents against the child’s will
  • Free expression of ideas
  • Freedom
  • Education

The separation of children from their families and their detention under inhumane and deplorable conditions are in direct opposition to all these interests.

The emotional impact of the separation

The negative effects, both physical and emotional, on the children separated from their parents may not be apparent for many years and some may be irreversible.

The short-term emotional effects include:

  • Post-traumatic stress disorder
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Low self-esteem
  • Feelings of helplessness and hopelessness
  • Behavioral problems
  • Irritability
  • Sleeping problems
  • Changes in appetite
  • Loss of interest in pleasurable activities
  • Poor self-care
  • Feelings of guilt
  • Suicidal thoughts or behaviors

The long-term emotional sequelae can be reflected in:

  • Developmental delay
  • Poor psychological adjustment
  • Poor school performance
  • Regressive behavior
  • Aggression
  • Increased vulnerability to physical illness
  • Alcohol and drug use

Studies show that no matter how brief the detention, it may cause severe and long-term psychological trauma and increase the risk of mental disorders.3

Parents may also be affected due to the uncertainty of what may be happening to their child, which may manifest itself in:

  • Increase in physical and emotional problems
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder
  • Difficulty in their relationships
  • Suicidal thoughts or behaviors

What is Attachment?

Attachment is the bond between the child and his parents, which plays a fundamental role in the social and emotional development of the child. Adequate attachment fosters feelings of security in the child. Poor attachment can make the child grow insecure, with separation anxiety, self-esteem problems, trust issues, behavioral problems, and even extreme dependence on others.

The relationship between parents and children can continue to be affected even after being reunited, which may be manifested in:

  • Attachment problems
  • Reduction in parental authority
  • Poor parent-child relationship
  • Difficulties in child rearing

How can we prevent these negative effects?

  • Putting a stop to the separation of families and to the inhumane conditions in the detention centers. The separation of a parent from a child should never occur, unless there are concerns for the safety of the child at the hands of his/her parent.
  • Early detection of symptoms through mental health assessments and periodic reevaluations (especially when symptoms may arise later as the separation or detention persists).
  • Coordination of services:
      o Physical health
      o Mental health
      o Legal
      o Interpretation in the child’s primary language
  • Psychotherapy and counseling can help the children and their parents to deal with their feelings or negative thoughts, identify stressors, and strengthen coping skills. Therapy can assist in processing emotions and offer support and hope.
  • Psychiatric medications may also control symptoms of depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, or any other mental health condition.
  • Finally, there should be no shame in seeking help, which can improve the lives of the child and his/her family.

Remember…

Be Smart. Be Safe. Be Healthy. Be Strong.

Until next time!

Dr. Felix

References:

1American Psychiatric Association. (2018, June 20). Mental health organizations urge administration to halt policy separating children and parents at U.S. border. Retrieved from https://www.psychiatry.org/newsroom/news-releases/mental-health-organizations-urge-administration-to-halt-policy-separating-children-and-parents-at-u-s-border/

2United Nations. Convention on the Rights of the Child. Retrieved from https://www.ohchr.org/en/professionalinterest/pages/crc.aspx/

3Linton, J.M., Griffin, M., Shapiro, A.J. (2017, March). Detention of immigrant children. American Academy of Pediatrics. Retrieved from http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/pediatrics/early/2017/03/09/peds.2017-0483.full.pdf

Suicide: Faces We See, Hearts We Cannot Know…1

The recent suicide of actor Robin Williams is a tragic reminder of one of our society’s epidemics. Many have been left wondering, “How can such a talented and funny man end his life?” Robin Williams’ struggles with substance use and mental illness may have been public but, like many people around the world, his private turmoil and demons won the battle.

According to the latest data provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), suicide represented the tenth leading cause of death in the United States in 2011. If this were not alarming enough, suicide was the second leading cause of death among our teenagers and young adults (ages 15 to 34).

Recognition of warning signs, early prevention, and immediate assistance for anyone who expresses thoughts of suicide or attempts suicide are of great importance.

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE WARNING SIGNS?

Many warning signs for suicidal behavior are similar to symptoms of depression:

  • Feelings of sadness or hopelessness
  • Behavioral changes
  • Irritability
  • Anxiety
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Changes in appetite
  • Loss of interest in pleasurable or enjoyable activities
  • Poor hygiene
  • Feelings of guilt
  • Isolation from friends and family
  • Giving away or throwing out objects of personal value
  • Drug or alcohol abuse
  • Talk/verbal threats of suicide
  • Suddenly recovering from a period of depression (maybe after having decided to put an end to their suffering by ending their life)
Even in the presence of all these warning signs, it is extremely difficult to predict with certainty who will attempt suicide. We do know that the most important risk factor for the prediction of suicide is past suicidal behavior. In other words, a past suicide attempt is the best predictor of a future suicidal act.

RISK FACTORS FOR SUICIDAL BEHAVIOR:

Risk factors for suicide vary greatly from person to person depending on the severity of mental illness, personality strengths and vulnerabilities, and support system. The following list is not meant to be all-inclusive.

  • Sudden stressful life events (i.e. humiliating events, financial ruin, job loss, death of a loved one)
  • Interpersonal conflict
  • Economic problems
  • Legal problems
  • Mental illness
  • Medical problems (acute and chronic)
  • Intractable physical pain
  • Poor support system

WHAT CAN WE DO TO PREVENT SUICIDE?

It is important to recognize the above warning signs and risk factors as well as the symptoms of mental illness and alcohol/drug abuse. Early intervention is the most effective way to prevent suicide. Any statement of suicidal thoughts or suicidal behavior must be taken seriously. Anyone who expresses thoughts of suicide requires immediate medical evaluation.

WHAT ARE THE EFFECTS OF SUICIDE ON THE SURVIVORS?

The effects of suicide on friends and family can be devastating. People who lose a loved one to suicide tend to feel guilty for the death of their family member or friend, wonder what they could have done to prevent it, and may even feel rejected by others.

Suicide survivors may experience:

  • Sadness for their loss
  • Anger towards the deceased family member
  • Feelings of guilt
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Posttraumatic stress disorder, especially when a witness to the suicide or finding the family member after a completed suicide
  • Suicide attempts to reconnect with their lost loved one
As the aftermath of family suicide may have long lasting effects, it is important for survivors of suicide to seek help in dealing with their loss.

HOW TO HELP?

Anyone who expresses thoughts of suicide or attempts suicide should be evaluated immediately:

  • Calling 911,
  • Taking the person (yourself) to the nearest emergency room, or
  • Looking for help from a mental health professional
Psychotherapy and counseling can help the suicidal person deal with his/her feelings or negative thoughts, identify stressors, and strengthen coping skills. Psychiatric medications may also control symptoms of depression, anxiety or any other mental health condition.

Help is also available through telephone hotlines. In the United States, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1-800-273-TALK or 1-800-273-8255) is an excellent source of support. It is for people in crisis, not just when thinking about suicide. The call is free and confidential and a mental health professional will be available to listen to you and provide information about mental health services in your community.

There is no shame in seeking help and it can save your life!

Remember…

Be Smart. Be Safe. Be Healthy. Be Strong.

Until next time!

Dr. Felix

El Suicidio: Caras Vemos, Corazones No Sabemos…

El reciente suicidio del actor Robin Williams es un recordatorio trágico de una de las epidemias de nuestra sociedad. Muchos han quedado preguntándose, “¿Cómo puede un hombre tan talentoso y cómico terminar su propia vida?” Aunque la lucha de Robin Williams con el consumo de drogas y la enfermedad mental pudo haber sido pública, al igual que muchas otras personas alrededor del mundo, su sufrimiento y demonios internos ganaron la batalla.

Según los últimos datos proporcionados por los Centros para el Control y la Prevención de Enfermedades (CDC), el suicidio representó la décima causa de muerte en los Estados Unidos en 2011. Si esto no fuese lo suficientemente alarmante, para los adolescentes y adultos jóvenes, el suicidio representó la segunda causa de muerte (entre las edades de 15 a 34 años).

Es por esto que la vigilancia de las señales de alerta, la prevención, y la ayuda inmediata para alguien que expresa ideas de suicidio o intenta suicidarse son de gran importancia.

¿CUÁLES SON ALGUNAS SEÑALES DE ALERTA?

Muchas de las señales de alerta son similares a los síntomas de la depresión:

  • Sentimientos de tristeza o desesperanza
  • Cambio de comportamiento
  • Irritabilidad
  • Ansiedad o tensión
  • Problemas al dormir
  • Cambios en el apetito
  • Pérdida de interés en actividades placenteras
  • Descuido del aspecto personal
  • Sentimientos de culpa
  • Aislamiento de amigos y familiares
  • Obsequiar o deshacerse de objetos de valor personal o favoritos
  • Consumo de alcohol y drogas
  • Hablar acerca del suicidio
  • El reponerse de manera repentina luego de un período de depresión (quizás luego de haber decidido quitarse la vida para terminar con su sufrimiento)
Aunque todas las señales estén presentes, es bien difícil determinar con certeza quien va a tomar la decisión de quitarse la vida. Lo que sí sabemos es que el factor de riesgo más importante para la predicción del suicidio es el comportamiento suicida pasado. Es decir, el haber intentado suicidarse en el pasado hace que la persona sea más propensa a intentarlo en un futuro.

FACTORES DE RIESGO PARA LA CONDUCTA SUICIDA:

Los factores de riesgo para el suicidio varían enormemente de persona a persona dependiendo de la severidad de la enfermedad mental, fortalezas y vulnerabilidades en su personalidad, y su sistema de apoyo. La siguiente lista no pretende ser exhaustiva.

  • Eventos estresantes repentinos (acontecimientos humillantes, ruina económica, pérdida del empleo, muerte de un ser querido)
  • Conflicto interpersonal
  • Problemas económicos
  • Problemas legales
  • Enfermedad mental
  • Problemas médicos (agudos o crónicos)
  • Dolor físico crónico
  • Pobre sistema de apoyo

¿CÓMO PODEMOS PREVENIR EL SUICIDIO?

Es importante reconocer las señales de alerta y factores de riesgo al igual que los síntomas de enfermedades mentales y el abuso de drogas y alcohol. La intervención temprana es la manera más eficaz de prevenir el suicidio.

Siempre debemos tomar en serio cualquier declaración de pensamientos suicidas o comportamientos suicidas. Cualquier persona que exprese ideas de suicidio debe ser evaluada inmediatamente.

¿QUÉ TRAUMA PROVOCA A LA FAMILIA EL SUICIDIO DE UN SER QUERIDO?

Los efectos del suicidio en la familia o amigos pueden ser devastadores. Las personas que pierden a un ser querido por suicidio tienden a sentirse culpables por la muerte de su familiar o amigo, preguntarse que podrían haber hecho para evitarlo, o hasta sentirse rechazados por otras personas.

Los sobrevivientes del suicidio pueden experimentar una gran variedad de sentimientos:

  • Tristeza por la pérdida
  • Enojo en contra del familiar perdido
  • Sentimientos de culpa
  • Depresión
  • Ansiedad
  • Trastorno de estrés postraumático, en especial cuando presenciaron el suicido o encontraron al familiar muerto
  • Intentos de suicidio para reencontrarse con su ser querido
Las secuelas causadas por la pérdida pueden afectar al sobreviviente del suicidio por el resto de su vida, por lo cual es importante que también busque ayuda.

¿CÓMO AYUDAR?

Cualquier persona que exprese ideas de suicidio o intente suicidarse debe ser evaluada inmediatamente:

  • Llamando al 911
  • Llevándola a la sala de emergencia más cercana, o
  • Buscando ayuda con un profesional de la salud mental
La psicoterapia y consejería pueden ayudar a la persona a lidiar con sus sentimientos o pensamientos negativos, aprendiendo a identificar factores estresantes que hacen que la persona reaccione de una manera u otra, al mismo tiempo que se aprenden las destrezas para poder reaccionar de una manera positiva. Los medicamentos psiquiátricos también podrían controlar los síntomas de depresión, ansiedad y/o alguna otra condición mental.

También se podría buscar ayuda a través de líneas telefónicas de apoyo. En los Estados Unidos, la Red Nacional de Prevención del Suicidio (1-888-628-9454) es una excelente fuente de apoyo. Es para personas en crisis, no sólo si se está pensando en el suicidio. La llamada es gratuita y confidencial. Un profesional de la salud mental estará disponible para escucharte y ofrecer información acerca de servicios de salud mental en tu comunidad.

¡No hay vergüenza en pedir ayuda y podría salvar tu vida!

Recuerda…

Sé Inteligente. Sé Precavido. Sé Saludable. Sé Fuerte.

¡Hasta la próxima!

Dr. Félix

El Suicidio en la Adolescencia

El suicidio es una de las epidemias en nuestra sociedad. Según los últimos datos proporcionados por los Centros para el Control y la Prevención de Enfermedades (CDC), el suicidio representó la décima causa de muerte en los Estados Unidos en 2009. Si esto no fuese lo suficientemente alarmante, para los adolescentes el suicidio representa la tercera causa de muerte.

Como grupo étnico, los hispanos tenemos la segunda tasa más baja de muertes por suicidio en comparación con otros grupos. Aunque a primera vista esta estadística parece ser menos preocupante, hay que señalar que los latinos intentan suicidarse con una frecuencia más alta que otros grupos étnicos, en especial entre los adolescentes. La evidencia también demuestra una tasa más alta de pensamientos suicidas y gestos suicidas en la población latina.

Es por esto que la vigilancia de las señales de alerta, la intervención temprana, y la ayuda inmediata para aquel que expresa ideas de suicidio o intenta suicidarse son de gran importancia.

¿CUÁLES SON LOS MOTIVOS MÁS COMUNES DE LOS SUICIDIOS ENTRE LOS ADOLESCENTES?

La adolescencia es un período de desarrollo estresante lleno de grandes cambios. Representa esa transición entre la niñez y la edad adulta marcada por enormes cambios hormonales, físicos, mentales, sentimentales, y de pensamiento.

El estrés causado por estos cambios puede influir en la toma de decisiones del adolescente y en la manera en que busca resolver sus problemas.

Algunos factores estresantes pueden incluir:

  • Cambios normales del desarrollo
  • Acontecimientos dolorosos
  • Disfunción familiar
  • Abuso físico, emocional o sexual
  • Problemas escolares o el acoso escolar
  • Problemas con la pareja
  • Orientación sexual
  • Algún desorden psiquiátrico

Estos factores, acoplados a la fuerte presión a ser exitoso, pueden causar gran perturbación para el adolescente. Los problemas también pueden parecer bochornosos o demasiado difíciles de superar. Para algunos adolescentes, el suicidio puede erróneamente parecer como la solución para terminar con sus problemas y/o sufrimiento interno.

¿CUÁLES SON LAS SEÑALES DE ALERTA QUE LOS PADRES O FAMILIARES DEBEN VIGILAR?

Muchas de las señales de alerta son similares a los síntomas de la depresión:

  • Sentimientos de tristeza o desesperanza
  • Cambio de comportamiento
  • Irritabilidad
  • Ansiedad o tensión
  • Problemas al dormir
  • Cambios en el apetito
  • Pérdida de interés en actividades que normalmente disfruta (jugar con amigos, vídeo juegos)
  • Descuido del aspecto personal
  • Mal comportamiento
  • Sentimientos de culpa
  • Aislamiento de amigos y familiares
  • Obsequiar o deshacerse de objetos de valor personal o favoritos
  • Consumo de alcohol y drogas
  • Hablar acerca del suicidio
  • El reponerse de manera repentina luego de un período de depresión (quizás después de haber decidido quitarse la vida para terminar con su sufrimiento)

Aunque todos las señales estén presentes, es bien difícil determinar con certeza quien va a tomar la decisión de quitarse la vida. Lo que sí sabemos es que el factor de riesgo más importante para la predicción del suicidio es el comportamiento suicida pasado. Así que el haber intentado suicidarse en el pasado hace que la persona sea más propensa a intentarlo en un futuro.

¿QUÉ MEDIDAS DE PREVENCIÓN PUEDEN TOMAR LOS PADRES PARA EVITAR EL SUICIDIO?

Es importante reconocer las señales de alerta arriba mencionadas ya que la intervención temprana es la manera más eficaz de prevenir el suicidio entre nuestros hijos.

Siempre debemos tomar en serio cualquier declaración de pensamientos suicidas o comportamientos suicidas. Cualquier persona que exprese ideas de suicidio debe ser evaluada inmediatamente.

Otras importantes recomendaciones incluyen:

  • Comunicación abierta entre padres e hijos
  • Fomentar confianza para que nuestros hijos se sientan cómodos hablándonos acerca de sus problemas y sentimientos
  • Apoyar a nuestros hijos (escuchar y evitar la críticas excesivas)
  • Mantener los medicamentos y armas de fuego fuera del alcance de nuestros hijos

¿QUÉ TRAUMAS PROVOCA A LA FAMILIA EL SUICIDIO O INTENTOS DE SUICIDIO DE SUS SERES QUERIDOS?

Los efectos del suicidio en la familia pueden ser devastadores. Las personas que pierden a un ser querido por suicidio tienden a sentirse culpables por la muerte de su familiar, preguntarse que podrían haber hecho para evitarlo, o hasta sentirse rechazados por otros familiares o amigos.

Los sobrevivientes del suicidio pueden experimentar una gran variedad de sentimientos:

  • Tristeza por la pérdida
  • Enojo en contra del familiar perdido
  • Sentimientos de culpa
  • Depresión
  • Ansiedad
  • Trastorno de estrés postraumático, en especial cuando presenciaron el suicido o encontraron al familiar muerto
  • Intentos de suicidio para reencontrarse con su ser querido

Las secuelas causadas por la pérdida pueden afectar al sobreviviente del suicidio por el resto de su vida, por lo cual es importante que también busque ayuda.

¿CÓMO AYUDAR A ALGUIEN QUE PIENSA SUICIDARSE?

Cualquier persona que exprese ideas de suicidio o intente suicidarse debe ser evaluada inmediatamente:

  • Llama al 911
  • Lleva a la persona a la sala de emergencia más cercana, o
  • Busca ayuda con un profesional de la salud mental

La psicoterapia y consejería pueden ayudar a la persona a lidiar con sus sentimientos o pensamientos negativos, aprendiendo a identificar factores estresantes que hacen que la persona reaccione de una manera u otra, al mismo tiempo que se aprenden las destrezas para poder reaccionar de una manera positiva. Por su parte, los medicamentos psiquiátricos podrían controlar los síntomas de depresión, ansiedad o alguna otra condición mental.

La Red Nacional de Prevención del Suicidio (1-888-628-9454) es también una excelente fuente de apoyo. Es para personas en crisis, no tan sólo si se está pensando en el suicidio. La llamada es gratuita y confidencial. Un profesional de la salud mental estará disponible para escuchar y ofrecer información acerca de servicios de salud mental en tu comunidad.

Recuerda…

Sé Inteligente. Sé Precavido. Sé Saludable. Sé Fuerte.

¡Hasta la próxima!

Dr. Félix

Teen Suicide

Suicide is one of our society’s epidemics. According to the latest data provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), suicide represented the tenth leading cause of death in the United States in 2009. If this were not alarming enough, suicide is the third leading cause of death among our teenagers.

Recognition of warning signs, early intervention, and immediately seeking help for anyone who expresses thoughts of suicide or attempts suicide are of great importance.

WHAT ARE THE MOST COMMON CAUSES OF SUICIDE AMONG TEENS?

Adolescence is an extremely stressful period in our development. The transition between childhood and adulthood is marked by enormous changes: hormonal, physical, mental, and emotional. The stress caused by these changes can have a significant impact on the teenager’s life.

Some stressors include:

  • Normal developmental changes
  • Painful events
  • Family dysfunction
  • Physical, emotional or sexual abuse
  • School problems or bullying
  • Problems with boyfriend/girlfriend
  • Sexual orientation
  • Mental illness
These stressful factors can be very overwhelming, too embarrassing, or too difficult to overcome for some teenagers. Suicide may erroneously seem like the answer to end their problems and/or internal suffering.

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE WARNING SIGNS?

Many warning signs for suicidal behavior are similar to symptoms of depression:

  • Feelings of sadness or hopelessness
  • Behavioral changes
  • Irritability
  • Anxiety
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Changes in appetite
  • Loss of interest in enjoyable activities (hanging out with friends, video games)
  • Poor hygiene
  • Feelings of guilt
  • Isolation from friends and family
  • Giving away or throwing out objects of personal value
  • Drug or alcohol abuse
  • Suddenly recovering from a period of depression (maybe after having decided to put an end to their suffering by ending their life)
  • Talk/verbal threats of suicide
Even in the presence of all these warning signs, it is extremely difficult to predict with certainty who will attempt suicide. We do know that the most important risk factor for the prediction of suicide is past suicidal behavior. In other words, a past suicide attempt is the best predictor of a future suicidal act.

WHAT CAN PARENTS DO TO PREVENT SUICIDE?

It is important to recognize the above warning signs. Early intervention is the most effective way to prevent suicide among our children.

Any statement of suicidal thoughts or suicidal behavior must be taken seriously. Anyone who expresses thoughts of suicide requires immediate medical evaluation.

Other recommendations include:

  • Maintaining an open communication with our children
  • Making our children feel comfortable to talk to us about their problems/feelings
  • Supporting our children
  • Keeping medications and firearms away from children

WHAT ARE THE EFFECTS OF SUICIDE ON THE SURVIVORS?

The effects of suicide on the family can be devastating. People who lose a loved one to suicide tend to feel guilty for the death of their family member, wonder what they could have done to prevent it, or even feel rejected by other family members or friends.

Suicide survivors may experience:

  • Sadness for their loss
  • Anger towards the deceased family member
  • Feelings of guilt
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Posttraumatic stress disorder, especially when witness to the suicide or finding the family member after a completed suicide
  • Suicide attempts to reconnect with their lost loved one

As the aftermath of family suicide may have long lasting effects, it is important for survivors of suicide to seek help in dealing with their loss.

HOW TO HELP A SUICIDAL TEEN?

Anyone who expresses thoughts of suicide or attempts suicide should be evaluated immediately:

  • Call 911
  • Take the person to the nearest emergency room, or
  • Look for help from a mental health professional

Psychotherapy and counseling can help the suicidal person deal with his/her feelings or negative thoughts, identify stressors, and strengthen coping skills. Psychiatric medications may also control symptoms of depression, anxiety or any other mental health condition.

Help is also available through telephone hotlines. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1-800-273-TALK or 1-800-273-8255) is an excellent source of support. It is for people in crisis, not just when thinking about suicide. The call is free and confidential and a mental health professional will be available to listen and provide information about mental health services in your community.

Remember…

Be Smart. Be Safe. Be Healthy. Be Strong.

Until next time!

Dr. Felix

PTSD and Response to Traumatic Events in the Aftermath of the Boston Marathon Bombings, Sandy Hook and Other Recent Tragedies

Following recent traumatic events, such as the Boston Marathon bombings, the Sandy Hook massacre in Newtown, Connecticut, and other tragedies in the United States and around the world, it is imperative to address the importance of early recognition and treatment of acute and posttraumatic stress disorders.

Acute stress disorder (ASD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may arise after direct exposure to a traumatic event, actual or threatened death of a family member or close friend, or repeated exposure to details about a traumatic event (1). Symptoms of ASD and PTSD are fairly similar and the distinction is largely based on the time frame to the beginning and duration of symptoms. Symptoms related to ASD last up to four weeks and must arise within one month of exposure to the traumatic event. In PTSD, the duration of symptoms is beyond 30 days. While your repeated exposure to details of a traumatic event from media coverage is not considered a cause of ASD and PTSD, the impact of graphic and violent images may affect people in different ways and may lead to temporary mood changes or worsen any pre-existing depressive or anxiety disorders.

The lifetime prevalence of PTSD in the United States adult population is estimated to be 6.8% (2). Women may be up to three times more likely to develop PTSD than men. Risk factors to develop PTSD, in addition to exposure to a traumatic event, include: being a female, having other mental illnesses (like depression and anxiety), having a family history of psychiatric illness, being a victim of abuse, or having a poor support system.

The following are key symptoms of PTSD but this condition may affect you in many different ways. Symptoms may also become severe enough to the point that they affect your day-to-day life and functioning.

Flashbacks or intrusive thoughts about the trauma

Nightmares or recurring dreams (about the trauma or with related themes)

Avoidance of memories or outside cues that remind you of the trauma (for example: blocking memories, avoiding conversations about the trauma, or driving the long way home to avoid the intersection where your car accident occurred)

Anxiety

Being easily frightened or startled

Sleep problems

Difficulty concentrating

Irritability or anger

Survivor’s guilt

Social isolation

Depression

Loss of interest in pleasurable activities

Feelings of detachment or numbness

Inability to fully express your emotions

Mistrust of others

Thoughts of suicide or suicide attempts

Early intervention following a traumatic event is important. For some people, talking about it with a family member or friend (“getting it off your chest”) may be enough. Others may need longer treatment with therapy and even medication.

Talk about your feelings: How safe do I feel? How has the trauma affected me? Am I afraid to leave the house? Am I self-medicating with drugs or alcohol? Why is my family so worried? What can I do?

The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1-800-273-TALK or 1-800-273-8255) is an excellent source of support. It is for people in crisis, not just if you are thinking of ending your life. When you dial Lifeline, your call is routed to the crisis center closest to your location. The call is free and confidential. Someone will be there to listen to you and to provide you with information on mental health services in your community.

Remember, there is no shame in seeking help. We all need a little push every now and then.

Be Smart. Be Safe. Be Healthy. Be Strong.

Until next time!

Dr. Felix

Trastorno de Estrés Postraumático a Consecuencia del Atentado del Maratón de Boston, Sandy Hook y Otras Tragedias Recientes

Después de acontecimientos recientes, como el atentado del Maratón de Boston, la masacre de Sandy Hook en Newtown, Connecticut, y otras tragedias en los Estados Unidos y alrededor del mundo, es imprescindible abordar la importancia de la detección temprana y el tratamiento de los trastornos de estrés agudo y postraumático.

El trastorno de estrés agudo y el trastorno de estrés postraumático pueden surgir después de la exposición directa a un acontecimiento traumático, muerte o amenaza de muerte de un familiar o amigo cercano, o la exposición repetida a los detalles de un evento traumático (1). Los síntomas del trastorno de estrés agudo y el trastorno de estrés postraumático son bastante similares y la distinción se basa en el tiempo transcurrido al inicio de los síntomas y a su duración. Los síntomas del trastorno de estrés agudo duran hasta cuatro semanas y deben surgir dentro de un mes después de la exposición al evento traumático. En el trastorno de estrés postraumático, la duración de los síntomas continúa más allá de 30 días. Mientras que tu exposición repetida a los detalles de un evento traumático difundidos en los medios de comunicación no se considera una de las causas de estos desordenes de estrés, el impacto de las imágenes gráficas y violentas puede afectar a personas de diferentes maneras y puede conducir a cambios temporeros de humor o empeorar algún trastorno depresivo o de ansiedad anteriormente diagnosticado.

La prevalencia del trastorno de estrés postraumático en la población adulta de los Estados Unidos se estima en 6.8% (2). Las mujeres pueden estar hasta tres veces más propensas a desarrollar este trastorno en comparación a los hombres. Los factores de riesgo para desarrollar el trastorno de estrés postraumático, además de la exposición a un evento traumático, son: ser mujer, tener otras enfermedades mentales (como la depresión y la ansiedad), tener un historial familiar de enfermedad psiquiátrica, haber sido víctima de abuso, o tener un pobre sistema de apoyo.

Los siguientes son los síntomas principales del trastorno de estrés postraumático, pero esta condición te puede afectar de muchas diferentes maneras. Los síntomas también pueden ser lo suficientemente graves como para afectar tu vida y funcionamiento diario.

Imágenes impactantes (“flashbacks”) o pensamientos intrusivos sobre el trauma

Pesadillas o sueños recurrentes sobre el trauma o temas relacionados

Evitar recuerdos o señales externas que te recuerden el trauma (por ejemplo, la represión de memorias, el evitar conversaciones sobre el trauma, o conducir el camino mas largo de regreso a casa para evitar la intersección donde se produjo tu accidente de automóvil)

Ansiedad

Asustarte fácilmente

Problemas del sueño

Dificultar a concentrarte

Irritabilidad o enojo

Sentimientos de culpabilidad como sobreviviente del trauma

Aislamiento social

Depresión

Pérdida de interés en actividades placenteras

Sentimientos de desapego o entumecimiento emocional

Incapacidad para expresar plenamente tus emociones

Desconfianza de los demás

Pensamientos de suicidio o intentos de suicidio

La intervención temprana después de un evento traumático es importante. Para algunas personas, hablar del trauma con un familiar o amigo (“sacárselo del pecho”) puede ser suficiente. Otras personas pueden necesitar tratamiento más prolongado con terapia e incluso medicamentos.

Habla de tus sentimientos: ¿Qué tan seguro me siento? ¿Cómo me ha afectado el trauma? ¿Tengo miedo de salir de casa? ¿Me estoy automedicando con drogas o alcohol? ¿Por qué mi familia está tan preocupada? ¿Qué puedo hacer?

La Red Nacional de Prevención del Suicidio (1-888-628-9454) es una excelente fuente de apoyo. Es para personas en crisis, no sólo si estás pensando en terminar tu vida. Cuando llamas a la Red, tu llamada será dirigida al centro de crisis más cercano a ti. La llamada es gratuita y confidencial. Un profesional de la salud mental estará disponible para escucharte y ofrecerte información acerca de servicios de salud mental en tu comunidad.

Recuerda, no hay vergüenza en pedir ayuda. Todos necesitamos un pequeño empujón de vez en cuando.

Se Inteligente. Se Precavido. Se Saludable. Se Fuerte.

¡Hasta la proxima!

Dr. Félix